Rise in radicalism

Alongside and at times, part of the rise of single issue politics, there has been a rise in radicalism.  The UK has seen the rise of far right political support and outside of formal politics, some campaigners such as some factions of animal rights, environmental and anti-abortion activists, have pushed the boundaries of civil disobedience and in some cases have used violent methods.  In addition, high profile terrorist attacks have raised public awareness of the threat of terrorism, particularly by those promoting Islamism. 

What are the implications?

Moving forward

The rise in radicalism is facilitated by a democratisation of the media which allows multiple voices to be heard but also implies that organisations have less control over their message.

  • How can your organisation maintain enough control of its message to ensure that it is not hijacked by (extreme) groups and that it continues to meet your mission and values?

The VCS has an essential role to play in preventing the rise in terrorist activity by promoting social inclusion and building social capital, as well as delivering benefits such as humanitarian relief to people in some of the poorest parts of the world.

  • Does your organisation need to take steps to reach marginalised sections of the community?
  • Can you work in partnership with organisations working with marginalised communities, to build trust, bridge divides and tackle discrimination in the community?

Want to know more?

This driver is a stub and will be completed soon.  Here we will link to external documents and resources for further reading.

Last updated at 13:47 Fri 05/Jun/09.

Recent comments

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Véronique's picture

Véronique

Third Sector Foresight

Demos has just started a new project on radicalism looking at the relationship between violent and non-violent radicalisation. Should be interesting.

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